SPCA International
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January 2015

Adopt a Hero: Mine Detection Dogs Returning from Afghanistan

Speak Out Against
Urban Deer Culls

Shelter Spotlight: Scaredy
Cat Rescue

Hey, Did You Know?



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Adopt a Hero: Mine Detection Dogs Returning from Afghanistan
SPCA International is looking for exceptional homes for seventeen retiring Mine Detection Dogs (MDD) coming out of Afghanistan in February. Are you interested in providing a loving, caring home to a MDD at the end of its lifesaving career?

These MDDs were donated to demining organizations in Afghanistan by another amazing group, the Marshall Legacy Institute. Over the past 3 years, Marshall Legacy Institute dogs have searched more than 1,415 acres of mine-affected land in Afghanistan, saving countless lives and making the land safe for thousands of people. And now, SPCAI is partnering with the MLI to find forever homes for seventeen of these incredible heroes that are ready to retire. The dogs are of various breeds and most range in age from 7-9 years old. Do you have room in your heart and home for one of these heroes? Fill Out an Adoption Application
Speak Out Against Urban Deer Culls
In a city known for its majestic scenery and peaceful beauty, recent news headlines in Victoria, BC, Canada have been quite the opposite. They have been darkened by news of an urban deer cull slated to start later this month. Learn How You Can Help
Shelter Spotlight: Scaredy Cat Rescue
Scaredy Cat Rescue in Newfoundland, Canada is a small, all-volunteer group that began in December of 2010 when two concerned women started to notice the vast number of feral cats living outside in harsh conditions without any shelter, food or human interaction. Today the group not only feeds and vets the numerous colonies, but they are often called upon in times of crisis. Find Out More
Hey, Did You Know?
A beaver's home is called a lodge and is built from branches and mud, typically in open freshwater for protection from predators. Beavers have a third transparent eyelid that helps them see underwater. They can remain underwater without breathing for up to 15 minutes and swim up to 5 mph. Their tail is a very useful tool: it is used as a rudder, a third leg while standing upright, as a lever to drag branches and can be slapped on the water to warn other beavers of danger.









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SPCA International
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